10 Best Practices For BYOD Policy

By August 31, 2015November 4th, 2015IT Security, IT Support in Toronto

10 Best Practices For BYOD Policy

Bring-your-own device doesn’t have to mean bring your own security problems.

Bring-your-own device doesn’t have to mean bring your own security problems.

Many enterprises now allow users to access corporate resources via their personal mobile devices. According to a global survey of CIOs by Gartner, nearly 40 percent of companies by 2016 will require employees to provide their own mobile products.

While BYOD reduces organizational cost for providing dedicated devices to each employee and provides flexibility and choice to the employees, it also introduces obvious security risks to the organization, such as unsecured devices accessing and storing business information. It also means additional overhead for IT in order to manage multiple devices with a variety of platforms and configurations to ensure compliance.

A large number of vendors offer enterprise class tools for managing BYOD users. But just adopting any relevant tool doesn’t solve the security problem: organizations also need to formulate solid policies for the use of personal devices and ensure these policies are executed properly.

Here are some best practices for preparing BYOD policies for your organization:

Determine organizational requirements: While adopting BYOD, consider work culture in the organization, habits of mobile users, and even the applicable laws to address legal issues. Think about the scenarios where the users prefer to access corporate data on personal devices, and common habits of users when accessing sensitive data. For instance, a sales manager might prefer to take down the orders on a tablet instead of carrying a laptop. Identifying these types of organizational requirements or restrictions can help in building a standard structure for BYOD adoption in organizations.

Policies must be for all: Different user roles have different levels of access controls and permissions, which implies the proper guidelines and scope of access must be defined for each user role. It often happens that top management is simply not present on the list, and granted all the privileges. Policies to manage personal devices should be applied for all user roles — even if they are granted superuser privileges, which also must be specifically called out in the policy document.

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